Tag Archives: motorists

New South Wales | Paramedics urge driver and pedestrian caution

NSW | 9 May 2012

The Ambulance Service of NSW is urging both drivers and pedestrians to be alert and aware with about 40 incidents of pedestrians being hit by vehicles in NSW in just five days.

This week there have been more than 25 incidents of vehicles hitting pedestrians in the Sydney region compared with only 10 incidents in the same period last year. Of these Sydney-based incidents, 14 occurred in school zone hours.

Acting Chief Executive of Ambulance Service of NSW, Mike Willis said no matter the time – day or night – drivers and pedestrians must keep an eye on their surroundings.

“It’s important for drivers and pedestrians to remember to exercise caution when they are on the roads or crossing them,” Mr Willis said. “Traffic conditions change rapidly so drivers and pedestrians should be alert and aware of what is going on around them and take care and caution on the roads.

“Never assume an approaching vehicle can see you or will stop for you. We see a lot of accidents occur at pedestrian crossings so you should always wait for vehicles to pass completely or come to a complete stop before crossing any intersection.

“Everyone has family, friends and loved ones. Fatalities and serious injuries affect not only the lives of the immediate victims but also that of many family members, friends and the community as a whole so it’s vital that all road users take their responsibilities to themselves and others seriously,” Mr Willis said.

In the event of a medical emergency, dial Triple Zero (000) and ask for Ambulance. Stay on the line and stay clam. The Ambulance Operator will remain on the line with you and can tell you exactly what to do until paramedics arrive.

Essex County | Flood advice for motorists

Essex County | 1 May 2012

The Essex County Fire & Rescue Service is warning drivers to take care and not get themselves and their families trapped by driving into flood water.

Over the last couple of days the Service has received dozens of calls to mindless motorists who have got themselves, and their families, into deep water by not exercising proper precautions in their car around flood water.

Assistant Divisional Officer Chris Noakes said: “It is mind boggling just how many mindless motorists have driven their car into flood water and need our help to get themselves, and often their families, out of their predicament.”

Just two feet of water is enough to float a car and six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars; this depth can cause loss of control or possible stalling as water is sucked into the exhaust or washes into the air intake.

Motorists should never attempt to drive through water deeper than the centre of their wheels. If water gets into the car’s air intake or into the electrics the car will stop leaving driver and passengers trapped.

The water could also be hiding damaged road or missing manhole covers.

Motorists should take particular care when crossing fords, these often become flooded and extremely dangerous with fast flowing water.

ADO Noakes added: “Every time there is flooding the Service has to rescue people who have driven their cars into flood water.

“When faced with water drivers should exercise a little common sense. If they can they should find an alternative route. If there is no way round they should park safely and get out to check the depth of the water before they drive into it.

“Just driving into water and hoping for the best is not an option, by the time you find out the water is too deep you are already trapped.”

Essex | Multiple rescues as motorists drive into flooded areas

Essex | 29 April 2012

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service have received a large number of calls to flooding and weather related incidents today.

These include cars stuck in flood water and trees and power cable brought down by the wind.

In total the service have attended 32 incidents so far today. Details of the more significant are below:

Incident 7892: B1037, Hill Road, Steeple Bumpstead. Attendance 1 x Wethersfield, 1 x Colchester, 1 x USAR Water Rescue, 1 x Haverhill (Suffolk)

Crews rescued a motorist who had got their car stuck in one foot of water. They had released them by 09:51hrs

Incident 7917: Padhams Green, Mountnessing Road, Ingatestone. Attendance 1 x Ingatestone.

Firefighters rescued four adults and two children after a driver drove their car into flood water. All six were safely out of the car by 12:13hrs

Incident 7919: Turling Road, Hatfield Peveral. Attendance 1 x Witham, 2 x Colchester, USAR Water Rescue.

Firefighters pushed a car out of flood water after the driver had got it trapped. The car and driver were out of the water by 12:23hrs.

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service is urging drivers to exercise caution before they drive their cars into flood water. A spokesman said: “It is mind boggling just how many people will drive their car into standing water with no idea of how deep it is.

“As we have seen today these people get their cars, and often their families, trapped as a result of their actions.

“When faced with water drivers should exercise a little common sense. If they can they should find an alternative route. If there is no way round they should park safely and get out to check the depth of the water before they drive into it.

“Just driving into water and hoping for the best is not an option, by the time you find out the water is too deep you are already trapped.”

British Columbia | City launches road safety program; Aim to reduce preventable road collisions, injuries and fatalities

Vancouver | 9 Feb 2012

The City of Vancouver today launched People are Fragile, a new safety awareness program to raise the profile of some common yet inconsiderate, risky and illegal behaviours that can cause serious harm to pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

The program is designed to raise awareness about road safety and ultimately prevent collisions, injuries and fatalities for all road users. The program, which uses outdoor advertising, sidewalk writing, social media and other tactics, addresses three key behaviours in and around intersections that put people at risk:

  • pedestrians jaywalking;
  • cyclists running stop signs; and,
  • motorists failing to yield to pedestrians in both marked and unmarked crosswalks.

The City intends to continuously improve the safety of Vancouver’s streets, particularly around intersections where the majority of conflicts occur between pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles.

The People are Fragile program builds on many City-led initiatives that have made our streets safer and more enjoyable for all users. Recent steps to make Vancouver streets safer include implementing pedestrian countdown timers at high-risk intersections, separated bike lanes on major cycling routes, and installing 43 new intersection safety cameras.

“While we’ve made many changes to improve the safety of our streets, we need to do more. Even one fatality is too many,” says Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson. “We urge all Vancouverites to remember that people are fragile and we all need to practice courtesy, be aware of our surroundings, and follow the rules of the road, especially around intersections. The responsibility for safer streets belongs to everyone.”

Every day, inconsiderate, risky and illegal behaviour continues to contribute to unsafe situations on city streets. According to the Vancouver Police Department’s 2006-2011 collision data, an average of 18 road users are killed in traffic collisions each year in Vancouver. Of those fatalities, 56 per cent occur at intersections.

“These dangerous behaviours can have tragic but often totally preventable consequences, especially for pedestrians who are the most vulnerable and most at risk of being injured and killed,” said Staff Sergeant Earl Andersen with the Vancouver Police Department Traffic Section.

According to the Vancouver Police Department’s 2006-2011 collision data, 61 pedestrians were killed in collisions:

  • 13 were jaywalking;
  • 21 were struck by drivers not yielding at intersections; and,
  • the remaining 27 fatalities resulted from a combination of pedestrian and driver error, confusion and inattention, and poor weather.

In addition, during the same period, five cyclists, 19 drivers, 11 passengers and 12 motorcyclists were killed in collisions.

“The City of Vancouver’s People Are Fragile program complements the awareness-building that ICBC does every year through our road safety campaigns,” said ICBC’s Director of Road Safety Fiona Temple. “Each one of us can play an active role by making smart decisions ― whether we’re driving, cycling or walking. Be alert, safe and use caution.”

“Every day, our health professionals treat largely preventable injuries from motor vehicle collisions. We support the People are Fragile program and other City-led initiatives aimed not only at preventing injury and death, but also at helping Vancouver become a healthier city,” said Dr. Patricia Daly, Vancouver Coastal Health Chief Medical Health Officer.

People are fragile, they are not invincible. Don’t let inconsiderate, risky, and illegal behaviour in the roadway put yourself and others at risk. Always yield to pedestrians at intersections, stop at stop signs, and cross at intersections.

To learn more about what you can do to be safe on city streets, visit the People are Fragile website www.practiceroadsafety.ca

Video of the three target behaviours can be downloaded on the City’s YouTube channel

Safe Streets – A City of Vancouver Priority:

Safe streets are a priority for the City of Vancouver and a number of initiatives are designed to make our streets and sidewalks safer and more enjoyable for all road users – pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. Here’s a list of key road safety improvements completed in 2011 and underway in 2012.

  • Installed pedestrian countdown crossing signals at 12 intersections, including at the 10 intersections with the highest number of pedestrian collisions in Vancouver.
  • Installed six new speed reader boards to monitor traffic speeds, a project done in conjunction with the VPD and ICBC.
  • Installed 43 new intersection safety cameras through B.C.’s upgraded Intersection Safety Camera (ISC) program.
  • Installed 14 new pedestrian/cyclist activated traffic signals.
  • Established a trial 30 kilometre-per-hour pedestrian safety zone on Hastings Street between Abbott and Jackson streets. This six-block zone is supported by speed reader boards, signage, 30 kilometre-per-hour pavement markings. The pedestrian safety zone trial seeks to address the fact that Main and Hastings has the highest number of pedestrian collisions of any intersection in the city – 46 per cent higher than Broadway and Commercial, the intersection with the second highest number of collisions.
  • Undertaking a comprehensive Pedestrian Safety Study and Action Plan to identify opportunities to improve pedestrian safety through engineering, education and enforcement measures. The plan is expected to be completed by the end of February 2012.
  • Established an Active Transportation Advisory Committee to advise City Council on strategic priorities relating to walking, cycling and all active transportation modes in Vancouver.

To view the Improving Pedestrian Safety and Accessibility Report to Council (July 26, 2011), please visit vancouver.ca.

Statistics and Rules of the Road:

Pedestrians

According to ICBC’s 2006-2010 statistics:

  • On average, 620 pedestrians are injured in collisions in Vancouver each year.
  • Approximately 41 per cent of pedestrian-related collisions in Vancouver occur on weekends (Friday through Sunday).
  • 42 per cent of pedestrian-related collisions in Vancouver occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.
  • In Vancouver, the top three contributing factors to collisions that involve pedestrians are driver inattention, pedestrian error/confusion, and weather.
  • According to the Vancouver Police Department’s 2006-2011 statistics, 61 pedestrians were killed in collisions:
  • 13 were jaywalking;
  • 21 were struck by drivers not yielding at intersections; and,
  • the remaining 27 fatalities resulted from a combination of pedestrian and driver error, confusion and inattention, and poor weather.
    • On average, 10 pedestrians are killed in Vancouver each year.
    • In 2011 alone, nine pedestrians were killed in collisions on Vancouver streets: four fatalities as a result of pedestrian jaywalking and three as a result of vehicles failing to yield to pedestrians at intersections.
    • Do not jaywalk. Jaywalking means to cross a road (not a lane), at any place which is not within a crosswalk and which is less than 1 block from an intersection where there is a traffic control signal.
    • Jaywalking is illegal under Section 12 of the Vancouver Street and Traffic By-Law 2849 and carries a $100 fine. Always cross at intersections.

Cyclists

According to ICBC’s 2006-2010 statistics:

  • In BC, the top five contributing factors to collisions involving cyclists with cause attributed to drivers are: driver inattention, failing to yield right-of-way, driver error/confusion, improper turning and weather.
  • In BC, the top five contributing factors to collisions involving cyclists with cause attributed to cyclists are: cyclist inattention, cycling on the wrong side of the road, failing to yield right-of-way (including stopping at stop signs), cyclist error/confusion, and ignoring traffic control device.

According to VPD’s 2006-2011 statistics:

  • Five cyclists have been killed in collisions.
  • Not stopping at stop signs on a bicycle is a violation of Section 186 of B.C.’s Motor Vehicle Act. The Vancouver Police Department may issue a Provincial violation ticket which carries a fine of $167. Always stop at stop signs.

Motorists

According to VPD’s 2006-2011 statistics:

  • 19 drivers, 11 passengers and 12 motorcyclists have been killed in collisions.
  • A driver must yield to a pedestrian in an intersection or crosswalk if the pedestrian is on the same side of the roadway that the vehicle is travelling or close enough to the middle that the pedestrian would be in danger.
  • Not stopping for pedestrians in these situations, even in unmarked intersections, is illegal and a violation of Section 179 of the B.C.’s Motor Vehicle Act.  Always yield to pedestrians at intersections.