Tag Archives: natural disasters

Mr Leung (third right) tours the simulation training modules.

China | Launch of Hong Kong Jockey Club Disaster Preparedness and Response Institute

Mr Leung (third right) tours the simulation training modules.
Mr Leung (third right) tours the simulation training modules.

Following is the speech by the Chief Executive, Mr C Y Leung, at the launching ceremony of the Hong Kong Jockey Club Disaster Preparedness and Response Institute this evening (August 20):

Dr Li, Mr Stevenson, colleagues, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen,

It is a great pleasure to join you today to celebrate the launch of the Hong Kong Jockey Club Disaster Preparedness and Response Institute.

Life is full of challenges and risk. Even though Hong Kong is one of the safest cities in the world, disasters and accidents can and do occur. Last week, a pregnant woman was killed by a falling tree in the Mid-Levels and we were all deeply saddened by the tragic accident. We definitely do not want to see similar incidents happening again and this reminds us of the importance of disaster preparedness and response to our community.

With climate change also comes change in weather patterns – this is something the whole world needs to deal with. Here in Hong Kong, just in the last week or two, we have experienced heavy rainfall in a short span of time. We are in the middle of the typhoon season. Our topography means that landslips can occur at such times, as well as flooding in low-lying areas. We have very good systems in place to deal with all of these weather incidents, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas.

Our densely populated and highly urbanised community, coupled with an open immigration policy, means that we are also vulnerable to outbreaks of infectious disease. We remain vigilant against the current Ebola virus scare, and we speak with the sad wisdom that comes from dealing with the SARS outbreak in 2003, not to mention avian flu and swine flu.

Here in Hong Kong, we have learnt much and already done much to prepare for emergencies or disasters. Preparedness plans and emergency strategies have been drawn up to cover various scenarios. We provide training, and stage drills to test our responses and actions in real-time situations. Thankfully, with the dedication of health-care personnel, law enforcement agencies and civil servants, as well as the co-operation of the community, we have been able to overcome many difficult moments in the past.

Yet, given the serious consequences of a disaster, and no matter how thorough our preparations are, we should never be complacent. That is why the establishment of the Disaster Preparedness and Response Institute – the first in Hong Kong – is so important. And here I must offer my heartfelt thanks to the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust and the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine for making it happen. Well done.

The Institute will provide comprehensive and detailed training for personnel involved in disaster management. It will provide a platform to enhance co-ordination between clinical and non-clinical responders, and will help build a common language among all agencies and professionals. It is a visionary undertaking that will contribute greatly to the provision of safe, high-quality disaster services for the community.

Disaster response cannot be effective if carried out in a piecemeal and disconnected manner – especially in today’s fast-changing and interconnected world. Close partnership with relevant players is essential to ensure a well co-ordinated disaster response.

I congratulate the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine on lining up experts and partners from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the University of Hong Kong, as well as from reputable overseas universities including Harvard and Oxford University, among others. The Institute has also established contacts with the Security Bureau and the Department of Health of Hong Kong Government, both of which have extensive expertise and experience to share.

I look forward to and welcome future co-operation and exchanges between the Institute and the Government to enhance disaster preparedness and response in Hong Kong.

In the long run, I am sure the Institute will not only help enhance our own skills and understanding, it will also help establish Hong Kong as a local and regional training centre in disaster preparedness and emergency response. Hong Kong has a fine record of helping our compatriots and neighbours in times of trouble; the Institute will add a new dimension and greater depth to such efforts.

Ladies and gentlemen, may I take this opportunity to wish the Institute an excellent start and convey my gratitude to all who have tendered their time and effort that has led to the launch of the Institute today.

Thank you.

Western Australia | Helping communities withstand natural disasters

Federal Justice Minister Michael Keenan joined the Western Australian Emergency Services Minister Joe Francis today to announce that over $2 million in Commonwealth funding is being made available to improve community preparedness for natural disasters.

 

This is part of more than $6 million the Commonwealth is providing to Western Australia through the current National Partnership Agreement on Natural Disaster Resilience.

 

Mr Keenan said the funding partnership between the Commonwealth and Western Australian governments would strengthen disaster resilience across Western Australia through

state-wide and community level projects.

 

“Although many natural disasters are unpredictable, we can all be better prepared. It is only by working together we can reduce the potentially destructive impacts of future disasters such as bushfires and cyclones,” Mr Keenan said.

 

Mr Francis said the funding was available to organisations across Western Australia to help attract, support and retain emergency management volunteers and to improve the ability of local communities to deal with disasters.

 

“These grants can be used for a wide range of projects such as upgrading firefighting facilities, building new emergency access roads and drainage works to cope with extreme flood events,” Mr Francis said.

 

Grants are available through the State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC).


  • Grant applications for the 2014-15 Natural Disaster Resilience Program open on 1 August 2014 and close on 30 September, 2014
  • Applicants are required to match funding applied for through dollar and/or in-kind contributions
  • More information available at  https://www.semc.wa.gov.au

Queensland | Take care of vulnerable residents

Natural disasters affect everyone, but for vulnerable residents an emergency event is particularly challenging.

The State Emergency Service (SES) is encouraging residents to get to know their neighbours and assist other residents who may have difficulties during natural disasters.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) Commissioner Lee Johnson said residents who spoke English as a second language, were new to the area, had a disability, or were elderly or isolated may appreciate help from their neighbours.

“Get together with your community and make a plan for floods, storms, cyclones and fires, including how you will assist vulnerable residents,” Mr Johnson said.

“For example, if one of your neighbours has hearing difficulties, ensure that someone in the community makes contact with them when a weather warning is issued or cancelled.

“Offer to help residents who are physically unable to secure loose items and keep them in mind if a flood is predicted. They may need help evacuating or shifting belongings above the water line.

“A community that works together is a stronger, more resilient community and more likely to recover quickly following a natural disaster.”

Mr Johnson said there were also resources available online to help vulnerable community members.

“Emergency services and the Red Cross have developed the Emergency REDiPlan, designed to assist people with a disability to prepare for an emergency,” he said.

“Fact sheets on topics like, floods, cyclones and emergency evacuations are available in 20 languages for residents who don’t use English as their primary language.”

For further information and tips on how to Get Ready and to register for your own personalised step-by-step plan visit www.qld.gov.au/getready

Queensland | Resilient Australia Awards winners named

The Queensland Alliance for Mental Health (QAMH) and a combined initiative of Queensland councils have been named the Queensland winners of the Resilient Australia Awards at a ceremony in Kedron this morning.

Minister for Police and Community Safety Jack Dempsey said 10 community groups and government and emergency service organisations were presented with a range of awards recognising innovative practices and achievements in resilience across the nation.

“These groups help make our communities safer, stronger, more resilient and better prepared to manage any emergency situation and I congratulate them on their achievements,” Mr Dempsey said.

“The award recipients ranged from non-profit groups to local councils which created extraordinary programs and initiatives that engaged the community and encouraged people to prepare their homes, help their neighbours and educate themselves on natural disasters.

“These programs helped transform groups of volunteers into well-supported and organised units, brought communities together and ensured that residents were well-informed before, during and after an event.”

Mr Dempsey said the QAMH and the Queensland councils were well deserving of their wins.

“QAMH identified the impact natural disasters had on the mental well-being of the community and developed Resilient Places, a program encouraging mental health recovery through the provision of resources and grants for community events aimed at building resilience at a community level,” he said.

“Seventeen local councils, supported by the Local Government Association of Queensland, delivered the Community Development and Engagement Initiative, a project responsible for around 250 events and activities which encouraged resilience and helped rebuild communities following natural disasters.”

Mr Dempsey said the major Queensland winners would go on to contend the national Resilient Australia Awards, putting Queensland’s ideas on a national stage.

“We wish the Queensland winners all the best at the national level of judging,” he said. “Last week was Get Ready week and it was pleasing to see so many communities band together to prepare for the upcoming storm season.
I’m sure some of the ideas sparked last week will form next year’s batch of awards.”

The awards are an initiative of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department.

New South Wales | Natural Disasters Declared Following Flooding Across Northern NSW

Prime Minister Julia Gillard and NSW Premier Barry O’Farrell have today announced ten Local Government Areas will have access to jointly-funded national disaster assistance following extensive flooding.

Natural disaster assistance is available to affected residents, small business owners and primary producers in the following LGAs:

  • Ballina Shire
  • Bellingen Shire
  • Byron Shire
  • Clarence Valley
  • Coffs Harbour City
  • Kyogle
  • Lismore City
  • Nambucca Shire
  • Richmond Valley
  • Tweed Shire

The deluge right across northern NSW has resulted in extreme flooding in a number of areas.

The NSW State Emergency Service has been inundated with calls for assistance with the heavy rain, strong winds and flash flooding bringing down power lines and trees and ripping roofs off homes

Northern Territory | Urging Territorians to be prepared

Chief Minister Terry Mills today launched the secureNT natural disaster resilience campaign encouraging Territorians to be prepared for cyclones, bushfires, floods and other natural disasters.

“Television, press and radio advertisements are being run across the Territory to raise awareness of natural disasters in the Territory and to let people know the simple things they can do to stay safe,” Mr Mills said.

“Disasters can and do happen in the Northern Territory, so every Territorian should take a few simple steps to prepare their home and their families.

“After a large scale event and in a place as vast as the Territory, it could take up to 72 hours for help to arrive; therefore it is crucial for every household to have an emergency kit stocked with food, water and other household essentials.

“The Territory is home to extreme conditions, and I urge everyone to keep this in mind while preparing their emergency kit.

“We will also be getting the message out through social media including Facebook and Twitter.

“More useful information about preparing for, getting though and recovering from disasters can be found by downloading the free secureNT application and at the secureNT website.

“In an emergency situation, Territorians can keep up-to-date with important information by using these two mediums and listening to the radio.”

The campaign was developed by the Northern Territory Government in collaboration with the Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services and Bushfires NT.

The resilience campaign was developed using a grant from the Australian Government’s Attorney General’s Department through their Natural Disaster Resilience Program.

For more information visit www.securent.nt.gov.au

Saskatchewan | Text rather than phone during a natural disaster

A message from the City of Saskatoon:

Most of us are coming to rely on our cell phones and other mobile devices more and more. During a natural disaster, wireless networks are often overwhelmed by people calling to check in with each other or searching for updates online.

If that happens, it may be vital to remember that brief text messages, emails or social media use less bandwidth and may work even when phone service doesn’t. Even if a text, email or social media update can’t go through at the time, the message will wait and go through as soon as the system can accommodate it. This eliminates the need to keep retrying like you would if you were making a phone call.

If you are able to use your phone, keep your conversations short. This will free up wireless networks for others as well as emergency operations.

It is a good idea to charge your wireless phone batteries as soon as warnings are issued. You should also look at ways to conserve your phone battery and alternate ways to charge it. Conserve your battery by reducing the screen’s brightness and turning off Bluetooth and any applications you are using. Consider purchasing extra batteries or a solar-powered crank or vehicle phone charger to charge your phone’s battery if the power is out for an extended time.

If you have a battery-powered radio, tune into 91.7FM for regular updates rather than searching online.

Remember cordless phones rely on electricity and will not work during a power outage. If you have a landline, keep at least one corded phone in your home.

Having a way to contact your family and/or friends and either asking for help or letting them know you are okay becomes extremely important during a natural disaster. Remember texting will often work even if phoning doesn’t.

Texas | Ready or not? Emergency preparedness video series

Texas | 24 Jan 2012

Editor’s Note: This is an excellent series of videos and worth the investment of your time. They are well-researched, well-produced and ought to be emulated by other jurisdictions. – HN

Wildfires, hurricanes, tornadoes and flash floods – these are all common occurrences in Texas. Are you prepared? Watch Surviving Disaster: How Texans Prepare and learn from other Texans who have survived these types of disasters. Then make your plan. It happened to them. It could happen to you.

Introduction from Dr. David Lakey, Commissioner

Surviving Hurricanes: Grab it and Go

A Community Rebuilds: Recovering from Wildfires

Back to Business: Planning for Disasters

Ready for Anything: Preparing for the Next Flood

Winds of Destruction: A County’s Lessons

Facing Disasters: A Plan for Work and Home

Queensland | Harden Up website encourages self-reliance in major weather events

QLD | The Harden Up website, launched October 2011, provides weather data from the CSIRO, Bureau of Meteorology and Insurance Council of Australia to encourage people to take practical steps to become more self-reliant in major weather events.

With data and case studies from the past 150 years for more than 3000 Queensland suburbs, Harden Up allows locals to learn about weather specific to their area.

Funded by a grant from the Natural Disaster Resilience Program through the Queensland Department of Community Safety, Harden Up provides practical advice on how to prepare for and help others during a disaster event.

The site also allows you to create a plan to prepare your household for the weather event that you are most likely to encounter. These plans and resilience tips can be shared through Facebook and other social media.

Mahila Partnership is launched

Logo-high-res

Dear friends & colleagues,

As many of you know, Nicole Mason and I co-founded a non-profit this year – Mahila Partnership www.mahilapartnership.org. We are a grassroots organization dedicated to serving vulnerable populations and working on projects related to education, community and disasters. Most recently we have partnered with UMASS Boston’s Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities after Disasters. As their NGO Partner we will be working with them on their November 2008 International Conference on Rebuilding Sustainable Communities for Children and their families after Disasters.

You are invited to contact me directly to learn more, volunteer or learn about sponsorship opportunities. Please share this information with anyone you feel would be interested.

In support of the work at Mahila and initiatives at Caritas, I have been participating in projects related to women’s issues and disasters.

Also very exciting to me, (the amateur photojournalist that I think I am!!) I will be profiling issues in healthcare as well as the lives of women & their families as a result of our work through writing and photography. You will see my work on Big Medicine and other online & print publications. A new article will be posted on Big Med soon!

My work at BCPWHO and in healthcare in the areas of disaster management, domestic violence, vulnerable populations and emergency medicine will continue.

If you would like to learn more or have projects that you believe may benefit from some of these initiatives, you are invited to contact me.

Kindest regards,

Angela

Angela Devlen
Emergency Management, Caritas Christi Healthcare
President, Mahila Partnership www.mahilapartnership.org
Director, BCPWHO www.bcpwho.org
www.linkedin.com/in/angeladevlen
adevlen@mahilapartnership.org

PARTNERSHIP TO REVOLUTIONIZE REBUILDING AFTER DISASTERS

Mahila Partnership Partners with UMASS-BOSTON Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities After Disasters

[Boston, September 16, 2008] – The University of Massachusetts Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities After Disasters (CRSCAD) and Mahila Partnership have established a partnership, working together to strengthen communities locally and internationally; focusing on sustainable rebuilding after disasters, and decreasing the impact of disasters on women and their families with a focus on particularly vulnerable populations such as those experiencing domestic violence or poverty.

Together, along with other international partners an inaugural conference, “Rebuilding Sustainable Communities for Children and their Families after Disasters”, will be held at CRSCAD November 16-19, 2008.

“The central objective is to provide an intellectual forum for scholars and practitioners around the globe to explore how rebuilding of communities after war or disasters can be carried out in a way that promotes social justice, economic and political sustainability, and the full participation of all stakeholders,” CRSCAD Director Adenrele Awotona said about the conference, which began to take shape after a successful conference he held at the University of Massachusetts-Boston on rebuilding in Iraq.

Experts participating in the November conference include:

Grace Oyebola Adetula, Nigeria, “Female Ex-Child Soldiers: Case Studies for East and West Africa”

Ashfaq Ishaq, USA, “Rebuilding After Disaster: A Child-Centered Approach”

Tutty Alawiyah , Indonesia, “Rebuilding sustainable communities for children orphaned by the 2004 Aceh Tsunami: The Case of As-Syafi`iyah Special Boarding School for Orphans”

Kai T. Erikson, USA, “Lessons from Katrina” (tentative)

Diane Levin, USA, “Understanding the Impact of Disasters on Children and
Helping Them Heal and Thrive Afterwards”

More information about the conference can be found at: http://www.rebuilding.umb.edu/rsccfd/

In addition to the conference, together Mahila Partnership and CRSCAD will work with vulnerable populations to develop and promote sustainable methods of community rebuilding after disaster, with a focus on the issues of domestic violence and poverty, both of which make women and their families even more susceptible to disaster. “Along with CRSCAD, we will work with our partners to support sustainable redevelopment of communities affected by poverty, violence and disasters,” says Mahila Partnership co-founder Nicole Mason.

About The University of Massachusetts-Boston Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities After Disasters (CRSCAD)

CRSCAD works in close collaboration with practitioners, academics, researchers, policy makers and grassroots organizations in their search for the most appropriate and sustainable ways to rebuild their communities after disasters (both natural and man-made). The work of the Center includes applied research, early childhood education and family support, communications and intellectual outreach to academic experts, other research groups and policy think-tanks. It organizes and hosts seminars, workshops and conferences on various aspects of post-disaster reconstruction in partnership with public and private sector agencies in all the countries of the world.

About Mahila Partnership

Mahila Partnership is a grassroots organization dedicated to serving vulnerable populations by promoting self expression through the arts; fostering awareness through educational initiatives; working to end domestic violence and poverty; and training women and their families so they are better prepared for, and more able to recover from disaster. Together with our partners, we create and support innovative projects to reduce vulnerability, promote dignity, and strengthen communities through long-term, sustainable measures.